Search This Blog

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Why do we take Fosamax ?

[This article was extracted from http://www.drugs.com. Hopefully, it will provide an indepth explanation as to why some health providers are prescribing this drugs for elderly patients]

Fosamax alters the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in the body. Fosamax slows bone loss while increasing bone mass, which may prevent bone fractures.

Fosamax is used in men and women to treat or prevent osteoporosis that is caused by menopause, or by taking steroids. Fosamax is also used to increase bone mass in men who have osteoporosis, and to treat Paget's disease of bone in men and women.

Important information

Do not take a Fosamax tablet if you cannot sit upright or stand for at least 30 minutes. Fosamax can cause serious problems in the stomach or esophagus (the tube that connects your mouth and stomach). You will need to stay upright for at least 30 minutes, after taking Fosamax.

Take the Fosamax tablet first thing in the morning, at least 30 minutes before you eat, or drink anything, or take any other medicine.

Take each dose with a full glass (6 to 8 ounces) of water. Use only plain water (not mineral water, coffee, tea, or juice), when taking a Fosamax tablet.

For at least the first 30 minutes after taking a Fosamax tablet, do not lie down or recline; do not eat, or drink anything other than plain water; and do not take any other medicines including vitamins, calcium, or antacids.

If you need to have any dental work (especially surgery), tell the dentist ahead of time that you are using Fosamax. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Fosamax is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet changes, exercise, and taking calcium and vitamin supplements. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely.

Take Note  :

Do not take a Fosamax tablet if you cannot sit upright, or stand for at least 30 minutes. Fosamax can cause serious problems in the stomach, or esophagus (the tube that connects your mouth and stomach). You will need to stay upright for at least 30 minutes, after taking this medication.

You should not take Fosamax if you are allergic to alendronate, or if you have low levels of calcium in your blood (hypocalcemia), or a problem with the movement of muscles in your esophagus.

To make sure you can safely take Fosamax, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions :
  • trouble swallowing;
  • a vitamin D deficiency;
  • a dental problem;
  • kidney disease; or
  • an ulcer or other problem in your stomach or esophagus.
Some people using medicines similar to Fosamax have developed bone loss in the jaw, also called osteonecrosis of the jaw. Symptoms may include jaw pain, swelling, numbness, loose teeth, gum infection, or slow healing after injury or surgery involving the gums.

You may be more likely to develop osteonecrosis of the jaw if you have cancer or have been treated with chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. Other conditions associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw include blood clotting disorders, anemia (low red blood cells), and dental surgery or pre-existing dental problems.

However, it is not known whether Fosamax will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. It is not known whether alendronate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Fosamax without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.


Fosamax side effects

Some side effects for Fosamax may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist, or become bothersome when using Fosamax  :
Constipation; diarrhea; dizziness; feeling bloated or full; flu-like symptoms at the start of treatment; gas; headache; mild back, muscle, or joint pain; mild stomach pain or upset; nausea; taste changes; vomiting.
Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Fosamax :
Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, throat, or tongue); black, tarry, or bloody stools; chest pain; coughing or vomiting blood; difficult or painful swallowing; mouth sores; new, worsening, or persistent heartburn; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; severe bone, muscle, or joint pain (especially in the hip, groin, or thigh); severe or persistent sore throat or stomach pain; swelling of the hands, legs, or joints; swelling or pain in the jaw; symptoms of low blood calcium (eg, spasms, twitches, or cramps in your muscles; numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, or around your mouth).
This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

No comments: